Pre-Built Training Plan
faqs

Your important questions answered below.

How do I apply the plan?

How do I determine my T Pace for swim workouts?

Swim test protocol:

300-500 yd warm up.
6-8 x 50 yds on 10 seconds rest.
1,000 yd TT.
300 easy cooldown.

Example:

Johnny swims 17:45 for his 1,000 yd TT. This tells me Johnny’s swim pace is 1:46 per 100/yds. His 1:46 is called his T-pace. Now that we have the T-pace of 1:46 we can create swim workouts adjusted to this pace. For example, a very hard set for Johnny might be 10×100 @T-Pace on 10 seconds rest. This would mean Johnny’s goal is to swim the 100s at 1:46 pace. An easier set might be 10×100 @T+10 seconds on 30 seconds rest. Johnny’s goal for the 100 is 1:56. Another set might be 6×100 T-pace minus (-) 5 seconds rest. This means Johnny’s goal is to swim the 100 in 1:41.

As you can see there are many of variables and many workouts we can derive from that TT. It is recommended that you re-test your TT every 4-6 weeks.

How do I Apply My new swim Zones to my workouts?

How do I determine my FTP on the bike?

In biking, we want to know our heart rate training zones and power zones. To make this as easy as possible, we will use a standard 30 minute TT. From this TT we will be able to determine the correct training zones. I do advocate doing both an inside and outside LT tests.

Bike test protocol for inside testing:

The warm-up is 15 minutes of cycling, moving through the different gears, always keeping the cadence above 90 RPMS. Do a few short sprints to get your heart rate up and ready for the test!

You should start out in a gear that you can maintain 90 RPMS in. Make sure you remember what gear you started in.

The 30 minute TT begins. Give this your best effort throughout as if you were racing a 20k TT or sprint triathlon. The average power and heart rate for the entire 30 minutes is your Lactate Threshold or LT and/or your FTP (Functional Threshold Power).


You should finish knowing you gave it everything you had.

15 minutes easy cooldown.

HOW DO I APPLY MY Bike power ZONES TO MY WORKOUTS?

HOW DO I APPLY MY Bike heart Rates ZONES TO MY WORKOUTS?

How do I determine my run pace at Lactate Threshold?

In running we want to know our heart rate training zones, power zones, and pace. To make this as easy as possible, we will use a standard 30 minute TT. From this TT we will be able to determine the correct training zones. This is best if done on a flat uninterrupted path or trail.

Run test protocol: 

After a 15 minute warm-up of easy running, finish with a few quick 20 seconds bursts to get your heart rate in the correct training zone.

The 30 minute TT begins. Same as the bike test, we want to give this the best effort we can over the 30 minutes. The average heart rate and or power for the entire 30 minutes is your Lactate Threshold (or LT) and or your Functional Threshold Power. You should finish knowing you gave it everything you had. Conclude with 15 minutes easy cooldown.

HOW DO I APPLY MY heart rate Run ZONES TO MY WORKOUTS?

HOW DO I APPLY MY Run power ZONES TO MY WORKOUTS?

Understanding TrainingPeaks TSS and More

Lastly and maybe after some time, discuss the Training Peaks Training Stress Score (TSS), and how it plays into workout compliance and planning. You can go over how they can use Chronic Training Load (CTL), Acute Training Load (ATL) and Training Stress Balance (TSB) to understand fitness and recovery.

Other important data points, graphs or information you’d like your athlete to understand from the Training Peaks platform can also be provided after all the previous steps have been completed. This part can be an ongoing process; you want your athletes to understand the dynamics of training, but always at a pace that is good for them.

 

How do I add a new race into a Current plan for my A race?

We approach this differently for different distance races.

If you are racing an Ironman and you want to add a 70.3 race (as an A or B race), you’ll do the following:

On Saturday, one week out from the 70.3 race, ride 2 hours, with 2×30′ at 80% of FTP / and a short 30′ run off the bike.
On Sunday,  we recommend a run no more than 75 minutes, with 2×15′ at 70.3 goal run pace. (If the 70.3 is an A race for you, then cut the bike to 1×20′ at 80% of FTP and cut the Sunday run down to 45′ with 1×15′ at goal 70.3 run pace)
The week of the race, I would use the same taper week as the last week of your Ironman A race. These are short fast workouts and this taper will give you a chance to see how it will work for you for your A race. 
Post Race Week:  Monday – Thursday would include easy swims and bikes and skip any run workouts.
By the following Saturday, you should be 100% back on your Ironman race plan.

If you are racing an Ironman and you want to add an OLY or Sprint race (as a C Race), you’ll do the following:

Follow your normal plan the week of the race until Wednesday, as this would be your last day of intensity during the week of the Olympic or Sprint race. On Thursday, you would take it easy with a few easy recovery workouts, maybe an hour bike and a 30 minute swim. Friday would be an off day. Saturday would be a long ride day, but cut the time down to about 80% of what’s scheduled. For example if you have a 5 hour ride scheduled, cut that ride down to 4 hours. It can be easy, but get the time in the saddle. 
On Monday, post race, take an easy recovery day, but try your best to get back on the Ironman schedule by Tuesday. You may need an extra day or two of rest and that’s fine. 

If you are racing a 70.3 and you want to add a Olympic or Sprint race (as a C race), you’ll do the following:

Follow your normal 70.3 plan the week of the race until Wednesday, as this would be your last day of intensity during the week of the Olympic or Sprint race. On Thursday, you would take it easy with a few easy recovery workouts, maybe an hour bike and a 30 minute swim. Friday would be an off day. Saturday would be a long ride day, but cut the time down to about 80% of what’s scheduled. For example if you have a 3 hour ride scheduled, cut that ride down to 2.5 hours. It can be easy, but get the time in the saddle. 
On Monday, post race, take an easy recovery day, but try your best to get back on the 70.3 schedule by Tuesday. You may need an extra day or two of rest and that’s fine. 

If you are racing an Ironman or 70.3 race and you want to add a Olympic or Sprint race (as a B race), you’ll do the following:

Follow your normal training through the preceding weekend, and then use the taper you have for your A race, this week.
On Monday, post race, take an easy recovery day, but try your best to get back on the Ironman or 70.3 schedule by Tuesday. You may need an extra day or two of rest and that’s fine. 

If you are racing an Ironman or 70.3 race and you want to add a Olympic or Sprint race (as an A race), you’ll do the following:

On Saturday, one week out, ride 90 minutes, with 2×20′ at 90% of FTP / and a short 30′ run off the bike with a few miles at goal race pace. On Sunday, one week out, I would run no more than 60 minutes, with 2×10′ at OLY goal run pace. 

Use the taper you have for your A race, this week. On Monday, post race, take an easy recovery day, but try your best to get back on the Ironman or 70.3 schedule by Tuesday. You may need an extra day or two of rest and that’s fine. 

 

How do I schedule my strength training plan around my race schedule?
In-season strength training plans are periodized to support your swimming, biking, and running as they become more race-specific leading up to an A-race. Ideally, you want to end your strength training plan 2 weeks before an A-race. For B and C races, it’s ok to continue strength training through those race weeks, as long as the load isn’t contributing to muscle soreness. Otherwise, take those race weeks off from strength training, then continue the following week as planned.
Where do i find the Core 1 - core vi workouts?

The D3 Core workouts have been around since early 2000, and they have a reputation to put the hurt on! They have been adapted over the years, but in terms of a 6-10 minute core workout, they are pretty tough. You can find them here – if you have questions, please contact us at info@d3multisport.com 

How do I lay out a season?

This all depends on when your A race is for the season and you should work backwards from your A race of the season. If you are racing an Ironman, then 24 weeks before that would be the minimum to start your race-specific training, depending on your fitness level and your experience. If you are racing a 70.3 as an A race, then you could start that race-specific build about 16 weeks out. For an Olympic or Sprint A race you could start your race-specific build up about 12 weeks out.

We like to take the off-season to work on our weaknesses, for example, strength, or swim, bike or run. So, our suggestion is to start the off-season by working on your weaknesses. For example, if your weakest sport is swimming, we suggest working an 8 week swim block into your off-season. (We have a number of plans that can help you do this here). You may want to repeat that build with an 8 week sport focus for your second best sport as well. Depending on when your A race is you could use these 8 week blocks to build into your Winter Maintenance program or to go straight into your sport-specific program. We are always available to help you line up your season so if you have questions, please contact us at info@d3multisport.com 

How do I pull up my workout in Zwift?

To begin using Zwift with TrainingPeaks you’ll start by connecting your accounts. Once you have created a Zwift account you can navigate to my.zwift.com/profile/connections and find the TrainingPeaks section. Click “connect” and enter your TrainingPeaks username and password.  That’s it!

Now not only will your completed workouts sync to your TrainingPeaks account (including map and elevation data) but any Structured Workouts based on power for cycling, or distance and pace for running planned in your TrainingPeaks calendar will be available in Zwift as well. (You’ll also have a flashy TrainingPeaks kit available for your avatar as soon as you connect your accounts).

A note for Garmin users: if you are already using the Garmin Connect Autosync, you may be tempted to just sync your Zwift account to Garmin Connect, but Garmin Connect won’t “pass on” workouts from Zwift to TrainingPeaks to avoid potential duplicate workouts, so you’ll want to set up the Zwift sync to both Garmin Connect and TrainingPeaks individually.

How do I Sync my workout from Trainer road to Training peaks?

Here’s how Ride Sync works:

  1. Log into TrainerRoad and access your Account Profile
  2. Select Ride Sync from the menu on the left-hand side of the screen
  3. Click Connect with TrainingPeaks and enter your TrainingPeaks account information
  4. Authorize TrainerRoad to access your TrainingPeaks account

You can also upload a past ride you may have done before you linked your TrainingPeaks and TrainerRoad accounts.

  1. Select the workout you’d like to Sync to TrainingPeaks
  2. Click the TrainingPeaks icon from the options on the right-hand side of the screen
  3. Enter your TrainingPeaks account information (if this is your first time uploading a TrainerRoad ride)
How can i connect garmin to training peaks?

First you need to have a Garmin device in order for this to work. This works by first signing up for a Garmin Connect account if you don’t already have one and then connecting your Training Peaks & Strava account to it. This only needs to be done once. So now whenever you upload your workouts to Garmin Connect, whether wirelessly or through USB, it will automatically send those workout files to TP & Strava. No longer is the need to upload to multiple websites. Follow the links below.

  1. Connect TRAINING PEAKS account to Garmin AutoSync, click here. Enter your TP Username & Password, choose to sync your last 30 days of activities if you haven’t done so before, and your all set!

  2. Connect your STRAVA account to Garmin AutoSync, click here. Visit settings under your profile and look to the right column for Social Connections. Select Connect with Garmin and follow the directions from there. Once you’ve established this connection, any activities uploaded to Garmin Connect™ will automatically sync to Strava within minutes. 

  3. For Suunto users only: If you use Suunto Watches, you can connect your Training Peaks account to Movescount.com by clicking here.

What is the performance management chart (PMC) in training peaks?

In order to understand the Performance Management Chart better you can click on this link

what are the Total Stress Score (TSS), Constant Training Load (CTL), Training Stress Balance (TSB) in training peaks?

In order to understand the Performance Management Chart better you can click on this link

In order to understand the Constant Training Load (CTL) better you can click on this link


In order to understand the Training Stress Balance  (TSB) or “Form” better you can click on this
link

    How can i sync my workouts to Strava?
    Using this link you can connect your Garmin Connect account to Strava. 
    How can i upload my best bike split file to my garmin?
    Once you have a course file built in Best Bike Split you can then download that file to your computer and then upload it to your Garmin head unit. It will display the appropriate watts as you ride the course. You can watch the full tutorial here from Best Bike Split. 
    Can I purchase the same plan Thru Final Surge?
    We have a number of limited plans on Final Surge but we will be adding more and more plans as the off-season goes. Please check back here to see all the D3 training plans on Final Surge.